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All artwork, text and images © James Straffon 2021.

Kaptan June's bounty

A conservation project in recognition of the Kaptan June Sea Turtle Conservation Foundation (established in February 2011), and its extraordinary founder June Haimoff (MBE).

For over twenty-five years, Essex-born Ms Haimoff has fought to protect the sea turtle (primarily the Loggerhead Turtle [Caretta caretta]) breeding grounds centred around the Dalyan River Basin, Turkey. With support from a variety of patrons, including Sir David Bellamy and Prince Philip (under his role as President of the WWF), her work has resulted in Dalyan/Iztuzu Beach becoming a Specially Protected Area (SEPA).

These works were commissioned by Cafe Ines, 587 Green Lanes, London.



All artwork, text and images © James Straffon 2021.

MERCY MERCY ME



MERCY MERCY ME
200 x 122 cm.
Spraypaint and acrylic on recycled board.
In 1971, Marvin Gaye wrote a song called Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology). It featured on his iconic album What’s Going On. The track was intended to strike a resonant chord, as an erstwhile archaic anthem, bringing light to the ills of environmental degradation. At the time he told Rolling Stone magazine “I began to reevaluate my whole concept of what I wanted my music to say. I realised that I had to put my own fantasies behind me if I wanted to write songs that would reach the souls of people. I wanted them to take a look at what was happening in the world.”
Half a century later, the poignant words of Gaye’s flipped paean to industrialisation, corporate greed and the wanton destruction of the natural world have been lost under a deluge of vanilla popular music, and artistic expression primarily derived from introspection and shallow excess. His closing refrain ‘How much more abuse from man can she stand?’ is at once heart-rending, tragic and painfully prophetic.
Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology)
Marvin Gaye. June 10th 1971. Tamla. (3:14)

Mercy, mercy me
Things ain't what they used to be, no no
Where did all the blue skies go?
Poison is the wind that blows from the north and south and east

Mercy, mercy me
Things ain't what they used to be, no no
Oil wasted on the ocean and upon our seas
Fish full of mercury

Mercy, mercy me
Things ain't what they used to be, no no
Radiation under ground and in the sky
Animals and birds who live nearby are dying

Mercy, mercy me
Things ain't what they used to be
What about this overcrowded land
How much more abuse from man can she
stand?


All artwork, text and images © James Straffon 2021.

Sirdar Chit Chat


Three Chaffinches and a sparrow begin a conversation on a London front garden wall.




 


All artwork, text and images © James Straffon 2021.

Shanti

Langham Place, London, July 2021.
With special thanks to

Seema Chandwani
Labour Councillor for West Green Ward
Cabinet Member for Transformation and Public Realm Investment
and
Stefanie Turton
Head of Housing (London and the South East)
Sanctuary Housing

Shanti

Print. Limited edition of 25. Signed.
Pigment print on Hahnemühle German Etching.
29.7 x 42 cm.
£150
(plus postage)

TO PURCHASE CLICK HERE TO SEND AN EMAIL

All artwork, text and images © James Straffon 2021.

James Straffon


James Straffon is an acclaimed British artist, who lives and works in London.

He works across a wide range of media, creating large-scale public art installations,
private commissions and gallery exhibitions. 

CONTACT
He is co-founder, and lead artist of the Turnpike Art Group.
For a miscellany of press links and articles, click HERE

All artwork, text and images © James Straffon 2021.

Pride and the Peacock


Pride and the Peacock
(spray paint and graffiti marker)

Commissioned by North London residents Lena and Kashaff.
The national bird of India introduces a bold splash of colour to an urban side street in Tottenham.

Available to buy as a limited edition print.






All artwork, text and images © James Straffon 2021.

COMMISSIONS


From individual works on canvas to entertainment industry production campaigns, interior and exterior installations to audio-tech product launches, James Straffon has worked with a broad array of clients, creating well-researched, contextually specific artistic solutions. His ability to work closely and thoughtfully to release a project's potential has resulted in an expanding collection of unique artworks.

If you would like to discuss a commission project send an email to
 james@james-straffon.co.uk












Skateboard artwork of Kate Moss by artist James Straffon
Skateboard artwork of Keith Haring by artist James Straffon
Skateboard artwork of Patti Smith by artist James Straffon





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All artwork, text and images © James Straffon 2021.

Through the Palace Gates


Through the Palace Gates
Running time: 7:18
A summer's evening walk along the grassy tracks where steam trains used to roll. Flora and fauna flourish at the Mannock Road Allotment in London - an urban oasis where the instinctive flow of the natural world juxtaposes with the chaos of city life. The many plots align left and right, around a grassy, dead-straight spine, reforming the cutting which framed the Palace Gates Railway Line. This short branch line was constructed by the Great Eastern Railway (GER), and opened on January 1st 1878. In time the expansion of the Piccadilly Line diminished the line's passenger traffic, with closure coming on January 7th 1963.

Shot on Fujifilm X-T20 using a vintage Minolta MC Rokkor-PF 55mm f/1.7.

All artwork, text and images © James Straffon 2021.

Urban and Street Art

















James Straffon has created urban and street art installations from London, across the UK and mainland Europe. He has expanded this approach into specially commissioned pieces ranging from works on canvas to site-specific projects on, both interior and exterior.

For commissions send an email HERE


































All artwork, text and images © James Straffon 2021.