I ain't got nothing against no Viet Cong


I ain't got nothing against no Viet Cong
38 x 31cm
Mixed media on card. Acrylic double-tray-frame.
£975

Muhammad Ali, who had recently changed his name from Cassius Clay, declared himself a conscientious objector and refused to go to the Vietnam war. He was subsequently denied a boxing license in every US state. Ali’s stance was clear "I ain't got nothing against no Viet Cong; no Viet Cong never called me nigger." Stripped of his titles in the US, he toured Europe, successfully defending his World Heavyweight title against Britain’s Henry Cooper. In an interview that year, the Champ explained how he got into boxing “Someone stole my bicycle and I said I was going to learn to fight so that I could catch him and beat him up. But I never did catch him. But I ended up the champ of the whole world.”

All artwork, text and images © James Straffon 2020.

More popular than Jesus



More popular than Jesus
38 x 31cm
Mixed media on card. Acrylic double-tray-frame.
£975

In 1966, John Lennon would meet Yoko Ono at the Indica Gallery, London for her exhibition ‘Unfinished Paintings And Objects’. That same year, he controversially suggested The Beatles were “more popular than Jesus”

All artwork, text and images © James Straffon 2020.

Hi Diddle Riddle


Hi Diddle Riddle
38 x 31cm
Mixed media on card. Acrylic double-tray-frame.
£975

Elvis releases Love Letters, Frankie and Johnny, Tell Me Why and If Every Day Was Like Christmas. He proposes to Priscilla Beaulieu.

All artwork, text and images © James Straffon 2020.

Nobby & Bobby



Nobby & Bobby
38 x 31cm.
Mixed media on card.
£975

When the World Cup came to London, the Jules Rimet Trophy was stolen while on exhibition. It was found seven days later by a mongrel dog named 'Pickles'. England historically went on to defeat Germany 4-2 in the final, captained by Bobby Moore, who played alongside England stalwart, Nobby Stiles - who played every minute of England's victorious 1966 FIFA World Cup campaign. Stiles famously celebrated the victory by dancing on the Wembley pitch, holding the Jules Rimet Trophy in one hand and his false teeth in the other.


All artwork, text and images © James Straffon 2020.

VOGUE50

An pop art collage artwork by artist James Straffon depicting fifty years of Vogue magazine 1916-1966


VOGUE50
60 x 60cm.
Mixed media on board.
£2,250

In 1966, Vogue magazine celebrated its golden anniversary. At the height of the swinging sixties, London was the centre of the creative world, across a multitude of industries. Therefore the natural choice to shoot the cover of a special 50th Anniversary issue was an English fashion and portrait photographer, born in the post-war East End - David Bailey - who owes much of his subsequent success to the then Vogue Art Director John Parsons.

All artwork, text and images © James Straffon 2020.