home




All artwork, text and images © James Straffon 2020.

Coastal Chic


Coastal Chic

In association with Collen & Clare.

A special commission for a boutique store in Southwold, Suffolk.
Work on canvas, plus interior walls. Spray paint and graffiti marker.
Main artwork 300cm x 150cm.

The project included a limited production of unique Anchor Tattoo artworks.













All artwork, text and images © James Straffon 2020.

Oh Yeah? Wham!

In association with Collen & Clare.

A series of unique anchor tattoo artworks, featuring the classic Popeye catchphrase.
Spray paint on handmade Khadi paper.
42cm x 29.7cm.
£125

These artworks are produced as part of the Coastal Chic commission.

For buying enquiries email shop@james-straffon.co.uk
or visit the CONTACT section

SOLD


SOLD

SOLD


SOLD









All artwork, text and images © James Straffon 2020.

An Objective Abstract


In 2015, James Straffon was commissioned by Architecture and Design practice Coppin Dockray to create a special interior mural for a client. The keystone, around which Straffon answered the proposal of a mural to be painted within a Modernist apartment in Highgate, London, was 'relevance'. There should also be some mechanic to forge a link between architecture and art.

Exploration of Highpoint's architect Berthold Lubetkin lead to his schooling around 1917 at the VKhUTEMAS - a Moscow-based school of art and architecture (the Soviet forerunner of the Bauhaus). Here Lubetkin was taught by leading innovators of 20th-century art, among them Kasimir Malevich - a pioneer in directly linking abstract art with architecture. Malevich introduced ‘Architectons’ or ‘tectonics’ - imaginary structures intended to transform our conception of our lived environment. This would latterly influence the naming of Lubetkin’s architecture practice ‘Tecton’.

In 1915, Malevich had developed an abstract art form called Suprematism - a painterly language of shapes and colours, which liberated the artist to depict greater spatial freedom. Free from the shackles of representation and the clich├ęd visual depiction of objects, this would become a series of 'non-objective' abtracts. Architect Zaha Hadid has been greatly influenced by this avant-garde system for describing space.

Adopting the core vernacular of Malevich’s Suprematism, Straffon devised a visual story - a journey through the spaces surrounding the proposed mural - from public to private areas - using colour and form to describe this journey and relationship. An initial non-objective abstract was formed from a series of carefully created forms - running from a large wall facing the Living Room, up a central staircase, and finally onto a landing which interfaced bedrooms and study rooms on the first floor. The result - a shared materiality, a relevance to its placement, and the sense of a form about which the surrounding architecture grew.

Following a second client consultation, Straffon subverted the original proposition of a 'non-objective abstract', adapting the concept to convey the ‘domestic’ and ‘private’, as well as a sense of belonging. This he translated into ‘personal’, with a requirement to harmonise; be relevant; apposite in its location.

Research in Anthony Gormley and humanist art, Leonardo da Vinci and the 'vitruvian man', Le Corbusier's 'Modular', the Nazca Lines, Anthropometry and sacred geometry would lead to series of measurements peculiar to the client - devised in two ways - via an abandoned Russian means to measure space, alongside the various widths and heights of books belonging to the client (using either spine or cover).


An interior installation street artwork by artist James Straffon set in Lubetkin Highpoint London

An interior installation street artwork by artist James Straffon set in Lubetkin Highpoint London

An interior installation street artwork by artist James Straffon set in Lubetkin Highpoint London

An interior installation street artwork by artist James Straffon set in Lubetkin Highpoint London

An interior installation street artwork by artist James Straffon set in Lubetkin Highpoint London

An interior installation street artwork by artist James Straffon set in Lubetkin Highpoint London

An interior installation street artwork by artist James Straffon set in Lubetkin Highpoint London

An interior installation street artwork by artist James Straffon set in Lubetkin Highpoint London

An interior installation street artwork by artist James Straffon set in Lubetkin Highpoint London

An interior installation street artwork by artist James Straffon set in Lubetkin Highpoint London


An interior installation street artwork by artist James Straffon set in Lubetkin Highpoint London


An interior installation street artwork by artist James Straffon set in Lubetkin Highpoint London

An interior installation street artwork by artist James Straffon set in Lubetkin Highpoint London

An interior installation street artwork by artist James Straffon set in Lubetkin Highpoint London



All artwork, text and images © James Straffon 2020.

COMMISSIONS


From individual works on canvas to entertainment industry production campaigns, interior and exterior installations to audio-tech product launches, James Straffon has worked with a broad array of clients, creating well-researched, contextually specific artistic solutions. His ability to work closely and thoughtfully to release a project's potential has resulted in an expanding collection of unique artworks.

If you would like to discuss a commission project send an email to
 james@james-straffon.co.uk

Or send a direct message in CONTACTS






Skateboard artwork of Kate Moss by artist James Straffon
Skateboard artwork of Keith Haring by artist James Straffon
Skateboard artwork of Patti Smith by artist James Straffon

















All artwork, text and images © James Straffon 2020.
 

block IP

--> lang="en-gb"